Last edited by Donris
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of Bibliography of Sino-Tibetan languages. found in the catalog.

Bibliography of Sino-Tibetan languages.

Shafer, Robert

Bibliography of Sino-Tibetan languages.

by Shafer, Robert

  • 329 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Harrassowitz in Wiesbaden, O .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Sino-Tibetan languages -- Bibliography.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementAssociate editors: Pentti Aalto [and others]
    GenreBibliography.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsZ7049.I3 S5
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6253344M
    LC Control Number58017521
    OCLC/WorldCa5790703

    The category of directedness of action in Tangut (prefixes correlates of aspect and mood) // Current issues in Sino-Tibetan linguistics / The Organizing committee of the th Intern. conf. on Sino-Tibetan languages and linguistics. Osaka, P. – Book review of Language Atlas of China, Bibliography of the Papers from the International Conferences on Sino-Tibetan Languages and Linguistics, The Sino-Tibetan Languages, 2nd Edition, ed. by Graham Thurgood & Randy J. LaPolla. London & New York: Routledge,

    PART 1 OVERVIEW CHAPTERS 1 1 A subgrouping of the Sino-Tibetan languages: the interaction between language contact, change, and inheritance Graham Thurgood 3 1 Introduction 3 2 Sino-Tibetan 6 3 Chinese 6 · · · · · ·. Jul 05,  · Two new languages, Amharic and Javanese, have been included. This accessible volume will appeal to anyone with an interest in thebindyagency.com features:Attention is paid to both grammatical and sociolinguistic featuresAttention is concentrated on the world's major languagesDesigned to be accessible to all readers with an interest in thebindyagency.com by:

    Sino-Tibetan, in a few sources also known as Trans-Himalayan, is a family of more than languages, second only to Indo-European in number of native speakers. The Sino-Tibetan languages with the most native speakers are the varieties of Chinese ( billion), Burmese (33 million) and the Tibetic l. Yeniseian Peoples and Languages book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. The Kets of Central Siberia are perhaps the most enigmatic 5/5.


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Bibliography of Sino-Tibetan languages by Shafer, Robert Download PDF EPUB FB2

Note: Citations are based on reference standards. However, formatting rules can vary widely between applications and fields of interest or study. The specific requirements or preferences of your reviewing publisher, classroom teacher, institution or organization should be applied. Sino-Tibetan, in a few sources also known as Trans-Himalayan, is a family of more than languages, second only to Indo-European in number of native speakers.

The Sino-Tibetan language with the most native speakers is Mandarin Chinese ( million), although since not all forms of Mandarin are mutually-intelligible, it may be regarded as a complex series of dialect thebindyagency.comphic distribution: South Asia, East.

Bibliographies focusing on work in other languages include French *(Aubin ), German *(Aschoff ), and Italian *(Angelini ). Tibeto-Burman. Tibetan is generally considered a member of the Tibeto-Burman (also called Sino-Tibetan) family.

High vowel devoicing is an important phonetic and phonological process in Hrusso Aka, a minority language of Arunachal Pradesh. The pervasive nature of high vowel devoicing is perhaps one of the. Sino-Tibetan (ST) is one of the largest language families in the world, with more first-language speakers than even Indo-European.

The more than billion speakers of Sinitic (the Chinese dialects) constitute the world's largest speech community. ST includes both the Sinitic and the Tibeto-Burman languages. No part of this book may be reprinted or reproduced or utilized in any form or by any electronic, mechanical, or other means, 1 A subgrouping of the Sino-Tibetan languages: the interaction between language contact, change, and inheritance Graham Thurgood 3 Bibliography Sino-Tibetan under the direction of A.

Crumb for the Sino-Tibetan project (Benedict, ). This book reconstructed proto-Sino-Tibetan languages and pairs of cognates of proto Sino-Tibetan and ancient Chinese. Data Science Journal, Volume 6, Supplement, 13 October S This is the 2nd edition, superseding Monograph 1: Bibliography of the International Conferences on Sino-Tibetan Languages and Linguistics I-XXI (LaPolla & Lowe, eds.

LaPolla & Lowe, eds. lxiv, pages. This book is currently out of print, but hardcopies. The Tibeto-Burman languages are the non-Sinitic members of the Sino-Tibetan language family, over of which are spoken throughout the highlands of Southeast Asia as well as certain parts of East Asia and South Asia.

Around 60 million people speak Tibeto-Burman languages, around half of whom speak Burmese, and 13% of whom speak Tibetic thebindyagency.comphic distribution: Southeast Asia, East. Bradley () includes Thewo and Choni as close to Amdo if not actually Amdo dialects. Hua () contains word lists of the Xiahe County 夏河, Tongren County 同仁, Xunhua County 循化, Hualong County 化隆, Hongyuan County 红原, and Tianjun County 天峻 dialects of Amdo Tibetan in Gansu and Qinghai provinces.

Media Inside ChinaLanguage family: Sino-Tibetan, Tibeto. Open Library is an initiative of the Internet Archive, a (c)(3) non-profit, building a digital library of Internet sites and other cultural artifacts in digital thebindyagency.com projects include the Wayback Machine, thebindyagency.com and thebindyagency.com The Tibetic languages are a cluster of Tibeto-Burman languages descended from Old Tibetan, spoken across a wide area of eastern Central Asia bordering the Indian subcontinent, including the Tibetan Plateau and the Himalayas in Baltistan, Ladakh, Nepal, Sikkim, Bhutan, Assam and Arunachal Pradesh.

Classical Tibetan is a major regional literary language, particularly for its use in Buddhist Early forms: Old Tibetan, Classical Tibetan.

Chintang (Chintang: छिन्ताङ् Chintāṅ / Chhintang) is an eastern Kiranti language spoken by 5, to 6, people in Chhintang and Ahale VDC's of Dhankuta District, Province No.

1, thebindyagency.comts are Mulgaun and Sambhugaon. ReferencesLanguage family: Sino-Tibetan. Bibliography.

T-S. Sun Jackson, "Phonological profile of Zhongu: a new Tibetan dialect of Northern Sichuan".Language and Linguistics, 4/4, –Language family: Sino-Tibetan, Tibeto. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SINO- TIBETAN LANGUAGES AND LINGUISTICS. Student Book Co., Taipei, Taiwan. Hartmann, John F., Nicholas Zefran, and John Robinson Computerized Merging and Sorting of Tai Dam Lexicons.

International Conference on Sino- Tibetan Languages and Literatures. Paris. (unpub. paper) Hickey, Gerald Cannon. This concise bibliography on South-African Languages and Linguistics was compiled on the occasion of the 20th International Congress of Linguists in Cape Town, South Africa, July The e-book version of this bibliography is available in Open Access.

Sino-Tibetan Sinitic (Chinese) Dongwang Tibetan is a Tibetic language of Yunnan, China, once considered a dialect of thebindyagency.com is spoken in the eastern part of Shangri-La County along the Dongwang River by Language family: Sino-Tibetan, Tibeto. Afroasiatic languages have over million native speakers, the fourth largest number of any language family (after Indo-European, Sino-Tibetan and Niger–Congo).

The phylum has six branches: Berber, Chadic, Cushitic, Egyptian, Omotic and Semitic. By far the most widely spoken Afroasiatic language or dialect continuum is thebindyagency.comphic distribution: Malta, Horn of Africa.

A comprehensive account of the Sino-Tibetan, a language stock comparable in size and diversification to Indo-European and comprising Chinese, Karen and over a hundred Tibetan-Burman languages. Dr Benedict presents a systematic analysis of the morphology and phonology of the main descendants of the stock, traces their family relationships and reconstructs in outline the parent language, Sino 4/5(2).

Sino-Tibetan negation and the case of Galo: explaining a distributional oddity in diachronic terms [Article]. The Sino-Tibetan languages, in a few sources also known as Trans-Himalayan, are a family of more than languages spoken in East Asia, Southeast Asia and South thebindyagency.com family is second only to Indo-European in terms of the number of native speakers.

The Sino-Tibetan languages with the most native speakers are the varieties of Chinese ( billion speakers), Burmese (42 million), and the.The Turkic language family alone includes some 35 living languages with hundreds of extinct dialects.

Though the short bibliography above is only a tiny fraction of the Silk Road literature out there, I think it’s one of the more useful and entertaining collections. As my research expands I hope to keep the above bibliography growing.The Tibeto-Burman family of languages (often considered a sub-group of the Sino-Tibetan language family) is spoken in various central and south Asian countries, including Myanmar (Burma), Tibet, northern Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, parts of central China (Guizhou, Hunan), northern parts of Nepal, north-eastern parts of Bangladesh, Bhutan, western Pakistan (), and various regions of India Geographic distribution: Southeast Asia, East .